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View Unit : Purpose and principles of Independent Advocacy

Unit
Unit Reference Number
M/502/3146
Qualification Framework
QCF
Title
Purpose and principles of Independent Advocacy
Unit Level
Level 3
Unit Sub Level
None
Guided Learning Hours
25
Unit Credit Value
4
Date of Withdrawal
SSAs
1.3 Health and Social Care
Unit Grading Structure
Pass
Assessment Guidance

The nature of this unit means that most of the evidence must come from real work activities.

Simulation can only be used in exceptional circumstances for example:

Where performance is critical or high risk, happens infrequently or happens frequently but the presence of an assessor/observer would prevent the Independent Advocacy relationship developing.

Simulation must be discussed and agreed in advance with the External Verifier.

The evidence must reflect, at all times, the policies and procedures of the workplace, as linked to current legislation and the values and principles for good practice in independent advocacy.

Required sources of performance and knowledge evidence:

Direct Observation is the required assessment method to be used to evidence some part of this unit.

Other sources of performance and knowledge evidence:

The assessor will identify other sources of evidence to ensure that the most reliable and efficient mix of evidence gathering methods from the list below. This will ensure that all learning outcomes and assessment criteria are met and that the consistency of the candidate's performance can be established.

• Work products

• Professional discussion

• Candidate/ reflective accounts

• Questions asked by assessors

• Witness testimonies

• Projects/Assignments/RPL

• Case studies

Learning Outcomes and Assessment Criteria
Learning Outcome - The learner will:Assessment Criterion - The learner can:
1

Understand Independent Advocacy

1.1

Define Independent Advocacy

1.2

Explain the limits to Advocacy and boundaries to the service

1.3

Identify the different steps within the Advocacy process

1.4

Distinguish when Independent Advocacy can and cannot help

1.5

Identify a range of services Independent Advocates commonly signpost to

1.6

Explain the difference between Advocacy provided by Independent Advocates and other people

2

Explain principles and values underpinning Independent Advocacy

2.1

Explain the key principles underpinning Independent Advocacy

2.2

Explain why the key principles are important

3

Describe the development of Advocacy

3.1

Explain the purpose of Independent Advocacy

3.2

Identify key milestones in the history of Advocacy

3.3

Explain the wider policy context of Advocacy

4

Be able to explain different types of Advocacy support and their purpose

4.1

Compare a range of Advocacy models

4.2

Explain the purpose of different Advocacy models

4.3

Identify the commonalities and differences in a range of Advocacy models

5

Understand the roles and responsibilities of an Independent Advocate

5.1

Explain roles and responsibilities within Independent Advocacy

5.2

Describe the limits and boundaries of an Independent Advocate

5.3

Describe the skills, attitudes and personal attributes of a good Advocate

5.4

Identify when and who to seek advice from when faced with dilemmas

6

Understand Advocacy standards

6.1

Describe a range of standards which apply to Independent Advocacy

6.2

Explain how standards can impact on the Advocacy role and service

Equivalent Units
There are no equivalences to display.
2.4.6.0L